Menstrual Cups: Pros and Cons from a Long Time User (with an Unboxing)

I have been using menstrual cups for almost three years.  I became curious about them when I was searching for an alternative to tampons.  During this process, I tried many different varieties on the market, starting with the Diva Cup, and now, Saalt.  The good news is that there are many more options on the market now, and the information on how to use reusable menstrual cups is widely available.  The bad news is, that while its been life changing for me, it may not be right for you.  It’s time for some straight talk about period options!

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Cup Vs. a Tampon



How to choose a menstrual cup that’s right for you:


This is the easy part: Put A Cup In It, a totally free website to help you. Their quiz will help you find out your best option.  How do they know?  They ask questions like have you had children, age, things like that.  It is quite simple, and you must use it to choose a cup.  For sure.  Don’t just go buy one off the shelf, because it needs to fit you properly.

Do you have a story about when it doesn't fit properly? What are the consequences?


How to insert the cup, and use a cup (for beginners):


This is where I share with you an unboxing of a Saalt menstrual cup.  I show you in the video what it looks like, and share some tips on how to use it more effectively.

Ok, so you are thinking about buying (or did you buy) yet ANOTHER menstrual product, now what…

Pros of a Menstrual Cup:


I promised straight talk, so put on your big-girl pants!

Menstrual cup users wax poetically about the freedom (compared to using tampons or pads), and I am no different. I have a day or two that are very heavy.  Tampons and pads would cause leakage, especially at night.   Even using a tampon, a sanitary pad (or panty liner), I still would have a mess to clean up in the morning.  Out and about during the day, I was always checking for leaks.  It’s embarrassing, and when you feel that gush? You know that you had better go check quickly. That doesn’t happen with the cup.

When the cup is inserted correctly, you can go for 12 hours without emptying it, depending on your cycle.


You heard me correctly.  12 hours.  On my heavy flow day, I usually empty it midday (just to be safe).  I typically wash it, reinsert it, and shower in the morning.  In the evening, I typically shower again, or I use this to clean up.  It’s pretty easy. “How do I remove a menstrual cup”  Also easy.  Just reach in, grab the bottom, pinch it, and remove.




Because I can go for 12 hours (the recommended time), my period no longer takes over my life.  I swim, go to the gym, and live my daily life without fear of leaking.  I don’t have to carry an entire other bag for tampons.  I do recommend using a panty liner until you get used to using the cup.  (I usually sleep with one too.)  The cup has been so freeing for me!

You only have to buy one when it needs replacing.


No more running to the store for emergency sanitary products.  Here is a link to one study that says that the cost of the reusable menstrual cup is 5% of the ten-year cost for tampons and pads.  They are more environmentally friendly too.

If you like this post, you may like this one about natural deodorants that work, and won’t make you break out. \

The Cons of using a cup:


You will have to get up close and personal with your period. 


What do I mean by that?  You will have to insert, remove, and empty the cup during your period.  Necessarily, it can get a bit messy.  If you have any blood phobias, this is not for you.  But honestly, how have you survived as a woman thus far? HA!

The up-front cost is more.


The various menstrual cups are more expensive up front than tampons, or pads.  They range on Amazon from about $10-20. 

Here is a money saving tip for you if you are an amazon subscribe-and-save user.  Once you take the put a cup in it quiz, add it to your monthly subscription (you can always delete it later).  That will give you an even bigger savings!  At the end of this post, I will link the cup that I am currently using, and the pantyliners I like.

There is a learning curve.


Once you get it, you will have no issues.


It can be uncomfortable to have a bowel movement in a public restroom - hell, ANYWHERE - with it inserted.


This is something you just get used to.  Don’t freak out on me.  When your bowel is contracting, it can move the cup down the vaginal canal.  I have never had it pop out or anything, but it has definitely moved to the entrance.  Never fear-just put it back into place.  In case you need more information on that, here is a link to find out more.



That is it!  Here is a video of me unboxing my new cup (Saalt), and talking about all of these things in depth.  As promised, check the end of this post for all of the products that I use during my period.  Please comment below if you have used, or are thinking about using a menstrual cup.




And if you like this post, you may love what’s in my makeup bag! 



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PInnable image for later!





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